From Conception to Creation: The Costumes for “Romeo and Juliet”

By Kalyn Oden, PR Intern

“In Fair Houston where we lay our costumes/scene”

Oh Romeo, Romeo why are you dressed so dashingly? As the world premiere of Stanton Welch’s Romeo and Juliet nears, a great deal of creativity has been brewing behind the scenes for several months at Houston Ballet. The company will perform the new production Romeo and Juliet from February 26- March 8, 2015.

The dancers glide beautifully across the stage, their movements telling the story. The scenery will have the audience feel as though they are in Verona, Italy with Romeo and Juliet. The costumes show a great deal of craftsmanship, detail and authenticity.  But why is this important?

Let me introduce one the very talented, Roberta Guidi di Bagno, Costume and Scenic Designer for Romeo and Juliet. Roberta will explain her creative process behind the costumes for the Romeo and Juliet.

Photo by: Sheila McKinnon
Photo by: Sheila McKinnon

What is the process in designing costumes?

Guidi di Bagno: The first thing is the conversation with the choreographer and the listening to the music (even if I know that particular music very well). With Stanton, we had long conversations prior to starting the designs. He had a very specific, challenging and interesting vision which immediately captured my fantasy and allowed me to start dreaming.

What was your inspiration for the costumes?

Guidi di Bagno: I drew my inspiration from the major Italian old masters from the 15th century; many of them came from Ferrara, my home town in Italy, such as Luca Signorelli, Piero della Francesca, Pisanello, Cosmè Tura, Perugino, Andrea Mantegna, Ercole de’Roberti, Lorenzo Costa, Andrea del Castagno, Francesco del Cossa, and Il Pollaiolo. In their paintings, I found many sources for colours and settings.

Sketches by Costume and Scenic Designer Roberta Guidi di Bagno
Sketches by Costume and Scenic Designer Roberta Guidi di Bagno

Are the colors and designs of the Montague and Capulets costumes significant?

Guidi di Bagno: Yes, very much so. Stanton has done a very specific and detailed study of Romeo and Juliet and wanted to define each family so that we can tell immediately, through the colors, who belongs to which group (Capulets, Montagues and Escalus). At the same time, he wanted every single character to be individual in its own colour within the family group.

That was probably the harder part: finding fabrics or trims that would tie everybody in its own family colour.

I know the headpieces have significance, what is this significance?

Guidi di Bagno: In those times, people would always wear a headpiece as a symbol of their status or just for practical reasons. It is rare to see a painting where women, especially, are not wearing something on their heads. Even the Madonna’s will wear their auras!

Sketches by Costume and Scenic Designer Roberta Guidi di Bagno
Sketches by Costume and Scenic Designer Roberta Guidi di Bagno

What are the most difficult parts in designing these particular costumes?

Guidi di Bagno: As in most of the ballets where you’re trying to tell a story, the definition of the characters through the costumes is the real challenge: you want them to seem to be wearing real clothing, but they need to be able to dance as if they were just wearing a second skin.

I always say that I try to create a skin over their own skin so that the dancers don’t feel restricted in their movements and the choreographer is totally free to create what he has in mind with his art.

What was the most exciting part in the designing process?

Guidi di Bagno: The most exciting and challenging was to find the fabrics and the ways to adapt fabrics such as leathers to a particular cut. It was exciting to find, together with Laura Lynch, the key to this, by sewing these materials, especially the leathers, on lycra [type of stretch fiber], so that they could fit the bodies perfectly.

For the women, we had fabrics especially made, which have both body and shine, and which are also extremely light and flowing.

What would like the audience to take away from the costumes?

Guidi di Bagno: There are various elements: I would like them to feel that they are actually part of the story. I would like them to forget that they’re seated on a modern chair. At the same time, I think people should feel that it is only theatre.

Now that your imagination is running wild, why not put it to ease and let Houston Ballet sweep you off to Verona, Italy for a magical evening?

————————————————————————————————

From February 26 – March 8, 2015, Houston Ballet presents the highlight of the 2014-2015 season:  the world premiere of a new production of Romeo and Juliet by Stanton Welch. One of Shakespeare’s most famous tales, Stanton Welch’s Romeo and Juliet will be a fresh, brilliantly imagined interpretation of the classic love story of two star-crossed lovers. The production is set to the exquisite score by Sergei Prokofiev and designed by renowned Italian designer Roberta Guidi di Bagno, who will create the spectacular scenery and costumes for the production. This new production, Houston Ballet’s first in 28 years, is made possible through the generosity of longtime Houston Ballet supporters Ted and Melza Barr.

For more information: http://www.houstonballet.org/Ticketing-Schedule/Season-Calendar/Modern-Masters-2015/

Watch Romeo & Juliet – A Spectacle in the Making:

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